Skip navigation Bottom Menu ↓ Menu ↑

Deck wars (Read 1075 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

  • politically incorrect
  • *
  • Conservative
  • Sequoia
  • Posts: 3472
    • Male
Deck 1  Al 0  :(

After we finished waterproofing the foundation which extensive involved block repair, waterproofing, drainage tile, and foundation wrap we got started on the 18' x 24' deck we have planned. It will also house the hot tub we purchased so it will need to be built to 100lb/sq ft rating, since the large tub (94" x 94") weighs in at 5700lb with water and people. The deck is two level, 18' x 16' and 18' x 8' for a step down level. The 18' x 16' section is built with 12', 6" x 6" PT posts in order to hold a clear polycarbonate roof overhead. We decided to do this because it will be a nice shelter from the rain, we will be able to put some nice furniture under it without worrying about the rain, and it will keep the snow and other debris out of the tub since we plan on using it all year.

Anyhow, Jules and I have have done 95% of the work, I have the structure completely built with the upper supports and beams in place, no roofing material or decking yet though.

On Sunday I was hastily measuring between posts, I have some plywood spanning over the joists to stabilize the ladders but the one piece of plywood seemed to move off of the joist that was supporting it and I was already on the ladder when I noticed the extreme instability. As I came down the ladder the plywood shot out and the ladder with me on it went crashing down onto the open joists and beams. I bounced my face off of one joist, the ladder kicked back at me at beat the hell out of my legs, and I must have hit my ribs on another joist. I had to go to emergency after two days due to the increasing pain in my lower left rib area, they did an ultrasound and took some x-rays. The concern was a ruptured spleen, but it appears to be okay and I'll likely just have to deal with the bruised ribs and the pain for a couple of weeks.

The project will have to wait until we return from holidays. I need to slow down and take better safety precautions before I do some serious damage to aging body.  :(

I'll post some pics soon.

  • politically incorrect
  • *
  • Spruce
  • Posts: 1284
    • Male
Hope that doesn't throw a wrench in your vacation. :(

As a mason I used scaffolding for almost every job. It just takes a little more time to setup but standing on something solid while work is being done makes it worth it. Plus you have your materials and tools right where you are working.

  • politically incorrect
  • *
  • Conservative
  • Sequoia
  • Posts: 3472
    • Male
Thanks brick, The ocean waves might be a bit much for me this time around but the pool there is beautiful, I'll just have to take it easy.

 I have a single section of scaffolding that is set up out there but it is only useful for the perimeter of the deck, the area where I was working is at the midpoint and a fence is along that side only a foot from the side of the deck. Jules told me I should have installed the decking prior to working on the upper structure, I suppose she's right in a way, especially for safety concerns but I was attempting to complete the structure prior to installing the decking in an attempt to preserve the beauty of the western red cedar that we chose for decking; ladders, tools, hardware, and other miscellaneous things that might mark up the wood. I could have been smart and used some tarps and/or plywood  :-\